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BLOG > May 2019 > Hurricane Season Approaches- Be Prepared

Hurricane Season Approaches- Be Prepared

Hurricane  forecasters are predicting a near to sightly above normal season with 12 to 14 storms. Five to Seven predicted to become hurricanes with four to become major.


Hurricane Predictions for 2019

Florida Keys After Hurricane Irma
The National Hurricane Center monitors the Atlantic Hurricane season, which lasts from June 1 to November 30 each year. The Eastern North Pacific season begins on May 15 and lasts until November 30 each year. The National Weather Service has issued Hurricane Safety Tips and Resources. Hurricane hazards also include tropical depressions and tropical storms. All can produce the following conditions:
  • Storm Surge - The abnormal rise in water caused by the winds from a storm and historically the leading cause of hurricane related deaths in the United States. Battering waves cause massive destruction to property and the surge can travel several miles inland along bays, rivers, and estuaries.
  • Flooding - Heavy rains from cyclones and hurricanes can cause flooding for hundreds of miles inland from initial land fall. The duration of the event can last several days after the storm passes.
  • Winds - High-speed storm winds can destroy structures and distribute flying debris missiles in the storm path.
  • Tornadoes - Outlaying areas of the hurricane or cyclone can produce tornadoes and dangerous thunderstorms
  • Waves - As the storm surge increase and the wind builds, the waves increase in size. Large waves can cause deadly rip currents, beach erosion, and coastline structure damage. Dangerous waves can begin when the storm is 1,000 miles from the coast.
The Weather Channel predicts this year's Atlantic season will be slightly above normal, but less active than last year. A total of fourteen storms have been named in preparation for the upcoming season. The season predictions are for seven hurricanes and three major storms. This is slightly above the 30-year average of named storms with six hurricanes and three major hurricanes. A major hurricane is considered Category 3 or stronger.

El Nino is the periodic warming of the central and eastern equatorial waters of the Pacific Ocean. A weak El Nino began in mid-April. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) expects this to continue through the fall, including during the heart of the hurricane season. A weakened El Nino produces areas of strong wind shear, wind speed, and sinking air height, which are hostile to the development of cyclones. Water temperatures contribute to the development of hurricanes. The surface temperature of the Atlantic is very close to the last three active seasons.

It only takes one major storm making landfall to leave a footprint of destruction. When an electrical power plant, sub-station, or any of the supporting infrastructure is in the path of the storm, electrical outages occur. If a complete infrastructure is destroyed, outages can be lengthy. There is no way to know how long utility power will be out after a storm. Restoration efforts are slowed and sometimes come to a stop without a dependable power supply. Diesel and Natural Gas generators can provide emergency power during times utility power is not available. Used generators offer an initial purchase savings. Diesel Service & Supply features low-hour, pre-owned generators of all models and sizes. All generators pass a 31-point inspection prior to inventory placement. Go to Inventory to see our in stock pre-owned models.

Options for Power During Utility Outages

New Cummins 500 kW Generator
The first step to restoring operation to industries, hospitals, residences, and other buildings is to clean up after the storm passes. Often, generators provide electrical power for the cleanup. Long-term power outages can be expensive to businesses. Many with critical power requirements have installed generators. The three basic models of generators are manufactured by various companies to satisfy customer requirements are:
  • Indoor - Engine, alternator (generator end), and radiator are mounted on a skid. An external fuel supply, exhaust, and radiator cooling must be connected to building services.
  • Outdoor - Generator configuration on skid is the same as indoor, with the addition of fuel tank and surrounded by a sound attenuated, weather-tight, or weather-proof container. Once set on a hard level surface, it's ready to be connected to the building electrical grid.
  • Portable - An outdoor generator configuration designed and constructed on a trailer. Ball hitch, ring & pintle, or 5th wheel connections for transportation. Can easily be moved from location to location within the site. 

Some clients prefer a new generator. We always have new generators in stock (see Cummins 500 kW in photo for an example) of various models and styles for businesses to consider. Go to New Generators to view our new in-stock generators. We can often arrange shipping for both new and pre-owned generators within 24-hours of purchase. All shippers are pre-approved and must adhere to stringent guidelines. 

Our services include shipping outside of the United States. We can arrange shipment of any generator to most locations in the world. 

Preparation for the hurricane/cyclone seasons should include maintenance and testing of the emergency or backup power systems. Performing manufacturer recommended maintenance procedures ensures the generator will perform to specifications when required. Load testing a generator places a load on the generator. Often upcoming problems are identified when a generator is placed and operated under load conditions. Generator Source is the division of our company that offers maintenance, service contracts, troubleshooting, load testing, deinstallation, and installation services. We also offer a rental line of generators for temporary power needs. Contact Us for more information.

Diesel Blog Team | 5/14/2019 3:19:47 PM | 0 comments
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